Papua New Guinea

Through Pacific Women, the Australian Government will spend approximately $88 million over 10 years (2012–2022) on initiatives supporting women’s empowerment in Papua New Guinea. More information on the partnership and nature of support is included in the Pacific Women Papua New Guinea Country Plan Summary. This is Papua New Guinea’s second country plan and several of the activities are ongoing and a continuation of the first country plan. Details on activities currently underway in-country with various partners is available via our interactive map. The list of program partners can be found here. Papua New Guinea is also supported by Pacific Women’s regional program, details of which can be viewed on the interactive map under regional activities.

Pacific Women works in the following areas within Papua New Guinea

Stories of Change


Empowering women starts within the family

Research on the interconnectedness of women’s economic empowerment and their decision making and safety in the family is informing programming to improve women’s livelihoods. A number of Pacific Women funded projects in Papua New Guinea work with husbands and wives together to change how they relate to each other, allowing women to have more control over decisions that affect their lives. This approach is showing that norms can be changed over a short period of time and that these changes are improving livelihoods and income for the entire family.

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Independent, educated voters in Bougainville

Independent, educated voters in Bougainville

The Bougainville Women’s Federation and International Women’s Development Agency are implementing the Voter Education Project to provide education on voting rights and responsibilities. It is having an impact on the way women exercise their right to vote, and on women’s leadership more generally.

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Gender-Smart Safety Resources

The Papua New Guinea Business Coalition for Women, with support from the International Finance Corporation, works with members to develop and adopt policies and practices that encourage the participation and leadership of women in the workplace.

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Pasin Bilong Lukautim Pikinini Gut or Parenting for Child Development

The findings of research are clear that reducing children’s exposure to family violence has significant benefits for their development and has the potential to break the cycle of family violence. A pilot project in Western Highlands and Madang in Papua New Guinea has supported mothers and fathers to learn positive parenting techniques. Following training, parents reported that they know more about child development and have significantly reduced harsh parenting practices.

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